Cookie consent script

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green-PDF eBook

5
comments
free ebooks

This is not so much an author’s note as an author’s reminder of what was printed in small type a few pages ago: This book is a work of fiction. I made it up.Neither novels nor their readers benefit from attempts to divine whether any facts hide inside a story. Such efforts attack the very idea that made-up stories can matter, which is sort of the foundational assumption of our species.I appreciate your cooperation in this matter.

The Fault in Our Stars by John Green-PDF eBook Free Download

Despite the tumor-shrinking medical miracle that has bought her a few years, Hazel has never been anything but terminal, her final chapter inscribed upon diagnosis. But when a gorgeous plot twist named Augustus Waters suddenly appears at Cancer Kid Support Group, Hazel’s story is about to be completely rewritten. Insightful, bold, irreverent, and raw, The Fault in Our Stars is award-winning-author John Green’s most ambitious and heartbreaking work yet, brilliantly exploring the funny, thrilling, and tragic business of being alive and in love. Praise for The Fault In Our Stars “A novel of life and death and the people caught in between, The Fault in Our Stars is John Green at his best. You laugh, you cry, and then you come back for more.” — Markus Zusak, bestselling and Printz Honor–winning author of The Book Thief “An electric portrait of young people who learn to live life with one foot in the grave.

CHAPTER ONE  

The Fault in Our StarsLate in the winter of my seventeenth year, my mother decided I was depressed, presumably because I rarely left the house, spent quite a lot of time in bed, read the same book over and over, ate infrequently, and devoted quite a bit of my abundant free time to thinking about death.Whenever you read a cancer booklet or website or whatever, they always list depression among the side effects of cancer. But, in fact, depression is not a side effect of cancer. Depression is a side effect of dying. (Cancer is also a side effect of dying. Almost everything is, really.)But my mom believed I required treatment, so she took me to see my Regular Doctor Jim, who agreed that I was veritably swimming in a paralyzing and totally clinical depression, and that therefore my meds should be adjusted and also I should attend a weekly Support Group.This Support Group featured a rotating cast of characters in various states of tumor-driven unwellness. Why did the cast rotate? A side effect of dying. The Support Group, of course, was depressing as hell. It met every Wednesday in the basement of a stone-walled Episcopal church shaped like a cross. We all sat in a circle right in the middle of the cross, where the two boards would have met, where the heart of Jesus would have been.I noticed this because Patrick, the Support Group Leader and only person over eighteen in the room, talked about the heart of Jesus every freaking meeting, all about how we, as young cancer survivors, were sitting right in Christ’s very sacred heart and whatever.

CHAPTER TWO 

The Fault in Our StarsAugustus Waters drove horrifically. Whether stopping or starting, everything happened with a tremendous JOLT. I flew against the seat belt of his Toyota
SUV each time he braked, and my neck snapped backward each time he hit the gas. I might have been nervous—what with sitting in the car of a strange boy on the way to his house, keenly aware that my crap lungs complicate efforts to fend off unwanted advances—but his driving was so astonishingly poorthat I could think of nothing else.We’d gone perhaps a mile in jagged silence before Augustus said, “I failed the driving test three times.”“You don’t say.”He laughed, nodding. “Well, I can’t feel pressure in old Prosty, and I can’t get the hang of driving left-footed. My doctors say most amputees can drive with no problem, but . . . yeah. Not me. Anyway, I go in for my fourth driving test, and it goes about like this is going.” A half mile in front of us, a light turnedred. Augustus slammed on the brakes, tossing me into the triangular embrace of the seat belt. “Sorry. I swear to God I am trying to be gentle. Right, so anyway, at the end of the test, I totally thought I’d failed again, but the instructor was like, ‘Your driving is unpleasant, but it isn’t technically unsafe.’”“I’m not sure I agree,” I said. “I suspect Cancer Perk.” Cancer Perks are the little things cancer kids get that regular kids don’t: basketballs signed by sports heroes, free passes on late homework, unearned driver’s licenses, etc…

CHAPTER THREE 

The Fault in Our StarsI stayed up pretty late that night reading The Price of Dawn. (Spoiler alert: The price of dawn is blood.) It wasn’t An Imperial Affliction, but the protagonist, Staff Sergeant Max Mayhem, was vaguely likable despite killing, by my count, no fewer than 118 individuals in 284 pages.So I got up late the next morning, a Thursday. Mom’s policy was never to wake me up, because one of the job requirements of Professional Sick Person is sleeping a lot, so I was kind of confused at first when I jolted awake with her hands on my shoulders.“It’s almost ten,” she said.“Sleep fights cancer,” I said. “I was up late reading.”“It must be some book,” she said as she knelt down next to the bed and unscrewed me from my large, rectangular oxygen concentrator, which I called Philip, because it just kind of looked like a Philip.Mom hooked me up to a portable tank and then reminded me I had class. “Did that boy give it to you?” she asked out of nowhere.“By it, do you mean herpes?”“You are too much,” Mom said. “The book, Hazel. I mean the book.”“Yeah, he gave me the book.”“I can tell you like him,” she said, eyebrows raised, as if this observation required some uniquely maternal instinct. I shrugged. “I told you Support Group would be worth your while.”“Did you just wait outside the entire time?”“Yes. I brought some paperwork. Anyway, time to face the day, young lady.”“Mom. Sleep. Cancer. Fighting.”“I know, love, but there is class to attend. Also, today is . . . ” The glee in Mom’s voice was evident.“Thursday?”“Did you seriously forget?”“Maybe?”“It’s Thursday, March twenty-ninth!” she basically screamed, a demented smile plastered to her face.“You are really excited about knowing the date!” I yelled back.“HAZEL! IT’S YOUR THIRTY-THIRD HALF BIRTHDAY!

Video Review

 

Download Instructions:

We upload PDF eBook to (mgjmp.com) to be long as possible online and available for download..

 

 

free download

 

 

 

5 comments to The Fault in Our Stars by John Green-PDF eBook

  • My Homepage  says:

    … [Trackback]

    […] Read More Infos here: get-cracked.com/the-fault-in-our-stars-by-john-green-pdf-ebook/ […]

  • Hay Day Cheats  says:

    Thank you

    Great ebook

  • stock tips  says:

    … [Trackback]

    […] Read More here: get-cracked.com/the-fault-in-our-stars-by-john-green-pdf-ebook/ […]

  • method  says:

    thankssss

  • Read Alot  says:

    |Thanks

Leave a reply

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>